Terms of flowering honey plants in the USA and Canada

According to observations of naturalists and beekeepers.

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Scientific name:

Crataegus douglasii

Life form:

Tree, Shrub.

Flowering time:

no data.

Flowering period

in North Dakota for this plant is: AprilMay.

NECTAR PRODUCTION:
56 - 112 kilograms per ha

SOURCE FOR HONEY BEES:
Minor


General distribution:

The most widespread occurrence of black hawthorn is in the Pacific Northwest, from southeastern Alaska south through British Columbia, Alberta, Washington, and Oregon to northern California. Inland distribution encompasses northern Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming, western Montana, and Idaho. Douglas hawthorn may also be found as a disjunct in northern Michigan, Minnesota, Saskatchewan, and southern Ontario.

Map of distribution and habitat in USA

This plant is present in at least 18 states/provinces in this country.

See The Map

Botanical description:

Black hawthorn is a large shrub or small tree ranging from 3.5 to 13.0 feet (1-4 m) tall and possessing straight, strong thorns 0.5 to 1.0 inch (1.00-2.50 cm) long. Leaves are generally 1.5 to 2.5 inches (3-6 cm) long, broad, and serrated at the tip. Blackish, smooth fruits are about 0.5 inches (1 cm) long. Numerous mosses and lichens are present upon the entire bark system.
Black hawthorn stems are usually clustered from the base or from a point just above the soil surface. Shade-killed lower limbs persist on the stem, creating large, dense thickets. Stems are very flexible and have been shown to withstand avalanche impact pressures of up to 10 tons per square meter.

Seasonal development:

This plant is flowering from April to May.

Black hawthorn fruits are considered ripe when they are black and lustrous. In Oregon fruit was dispersed from August 16 to 31, and in Washington from July 15 to 30.


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List of honey plants that may be blooming now in North Dakota
See the entire list

Acer saccharinum (aka: Silver maple, Soft maple)

Acer negundo (aka: Boxelder, Western boxelder, Arizona boxelder, California boxelder, Texas boxelder, Interior boxelder, Violet boxelder)

Salix lucida (aka: Shining willow, Greenleaf willow, Tail-leaf willow, Whiplash willow, Pacific willow, Lance-leaf willow, Longleaf willow, Red willow, Western shining willow)

Salix bebbiana (aka: Bebb willow, Beak willow, Beaked willow, Long-beaked willow, Diamond willow, Chaton, Petit Minou, Smooth Bebb willow)

Populus tremuloides (aka: Quaking aspen, Trembling aspen, Aspen, American aspen, Mountain aspen, Golden aspen, Trembling poplar, White poplar, Popple, Alamo Blanco)

Acer saccharum (aka: Sugar maple, Rock maple, Hard maple)

Crataegus douglasii (aka: Black hawthorn, Douglas hawthorn, River hawthorn, Western thornapple)

Prunus pumila (aka: Sandcherry, Western sandcherry, Eastern sandcherry, Great Lakes sandcherry)

Salix discolor (aka: Pussy willow, American pussy willow, Glaucous willow, Large pussy willow)

Salix amygdaloides (aka: Peachleaf willow, Peach leaf willow)

Celtis occidentalis (aka: Common hackberry, Bastard elm, Nettle-tree, Northern hackberry)

Salix lutea (aka: Yellow willow)

Astragalus (aka: Milkvetch, Locoweed, Goat's-thorn)

Robinia pseudoacacia (aka: Black locust, False acacia, Yellow locust, White locust, Green locust, Post locust, Falsa acacia, Robinia)

Rhamnus cathartica (aka: Common buckthorn, European buckthorn, Dahurian buckthorn)

Sinapis arvensis (aka: Charlock mustard, California rape, Charlock, Corn mustard, Canola, Kaber mustard, Rapeseed mustard)

Gleditsia triacanthos (aka: Honey locust, Honey shucks locust, Common honeylocust, Sweet bean locust)

Prunus serotina (aka: Black cherry, Wild black cherry, Rum cherry, Mountain black cherry, Wild cherry)

Prunus pensylvanica (aka: Pin cherry, Fire cherry, Bird cherry)

Tilia americana (aka: American basswood, Basswood, Linden)